2010: All Eyes On: Part Four : Amelia Ideh (putmeonit.com)

Putmeonit Amelia Ideh1, 2,3,… Part four in the ongoing series of 2010 predictions, and in comes Amelia of Putmeonit.com, one the nicest music blogs I’ve discovered over the last couple of months.

Amelia: “When Alex asked me to make some predictions for 2010 I realised it wasn’t easy to separate what I would like to happen from what probably will happen. This is a relatively optimistic view on 2010 since I will be blogging, producing live events, promoting great artists and generally doing my best to help make it a good year in music!” – photo: Shan Phearon

Get with the program,…

Female DJs & producers

We’ve had front runners like Georgia Anne Muldrow, Ikonika, Micachu, Cooly G, Goldielocks and Muhsinah making waves for a while, and this year I have the feeling Nadsroic, Tokimonsta, Eclair Fifi, Ahu, Josey Rebelle and DJ Kunto are names will be hearing a lot from. I think it will start to become much more commonplace for emerging female singer songwriters to take more control over their sound, and for women to get so sick of sausage-fest parties they’ll get behind the decks more often.

Africa 2010

I don’t mean the World Cup, I mean Tunde Adebimpe (TV on the Radio), Nneka, Ty, Sade, Eska, Michael Olatuja, Tinashé, David Okumu, Charlie Dark, Tawiah, Kwes, Bridgette Amofah, The Cock n Bull Kid, Tanya, Benin City, Beth Mburu and all of the other artists of African descent who are making truly brilliant original black music (that I think & hope will explode throughout 2010); and happily they probably owe more to their parents’ record collections and Radiohead than they do to current US R&B and hip hop.

Everyone and their Mum will get signed

Not just because of the number of indie labels out there, more than 25 MC based acts in the UK have been signed to major label deals recently. Labels have always played the numbers game (one Tinchy, or rather the Star in the Hood merch, will pay for 10 less succesful acts until they get dropped), but the cynic in me says that major labels are falling down a big black hole, clutching at branches they hope will all turn in to N Dubz, discarding the rest fast. It’s turning mainstream UK urban music in to Primark and at some point labels will have to start relying on talent, not marketing and promotion.

“Creatives”

If there’s one thing the recession proved it’s that a 9-5 doesn’t equal job security, and with writers like Steve Pavlina and Seth Godin around I suspect a whole new breed of freelance creatives will emerge, feeling like they may as well try holding two fingers up to “The Man” for once. I mean how hard can it be to learn a bit of CSS, Photoshop, or Logic?

Remember you’re an individual…just like everyone else.

People complained that the 00′s were bland and nondescript but in 2009 artists started to look like the love child of Bjork and David Bowie, developed a mysterious secret identity, shaved some of their hair off, and generally had to beg borrow or steal an “alternative” quirk. I think live shows will continue to get more and more elaborate, and the low budget – high return tour will all but disappear as competition for gig revenues increases. I think we’ll say goodbye to t-shirt and jeans, backing track PAs, lack-luster performers, and hello to more set, costume and lighting designers, great live bands, brilliant and interesting performances, and painful ticket prices.

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35 Responses to 2010: All Eyes On: Part Four : Amelia Ideh (putmeonit.com)

  1. BLA says:

    Black Music, Female Music, … do people still think in those awful(ly) limited and cruelly ignorant terms in 2010 ? You say it yourself that those black artists are more influenced by Radiohead than mainstream “black” music. So what makes it black music then ? Simply the color of skin of who made it?

    I truly hope we can get rid of those terms. I don’t listen to music because a girl or a tanned person made it. I don’t even know how most of the producers look like when I acquire their work. It doesn’t matter. Because if one needs to promote his music as being made by a female or black it usually is a sign the actual quality of it is of no means to sell it.

    I do think it’s a good sign girls like Cooly G, Muhsinah and Ikonika claim their position by being good and hope we get more female producers but please don’t make it a selling point.

    And Black music. Are people still refusing to buy music because of the color of the skin of who made it ? That’s just unbelievably sad.

  2. a fan says:

    Very well said BLA!

  3. bie says:

    I’m totally getting with the program!
    I love your predictions and I am rooting for them. Young girls and kids from immigrants still need succesful role models.
    Ignoring that is also a bit sad…

  4. BLA says:

    Why can’t Radiohead be a role model for immigrants ? … she even states they are … stop thinking in colours of skin for yourself, so that everyone else starts doing the same … that’s my point

  5. music lover says:

    Tanned? Wow, am i reading that for real? Tanned? We’re in 2010 and we’re getting tanned. Damn.

  6. LeFtOoO says:

    A good thing to see more women behind the turntables;

    btw Bla, you need a girlfriend…

    L

  7. M808 says:

    music is music. but…there simply isn’t enough women making music-why that is I don’t know-it just seems to be a strange global phenomenon. As a female producer I’ve never felt the UK industry was at all sexist or threatening although it is male dominant and that will never change. I agree that womnen need more encouragement and get more creative but as BLA said that should not be a selling point. there are ‘good producers’-not ‘good female’ or ‘good male producers’…gender/race or socioeconomic background should not influence how we hear and perceive any work of art. and for any females (or males) that don’t have creative control over their work-they should get a backbone, stand up for their work or don’t complain. If they agree to be lead and controlled, it’s simply their fault for making that choice.
    Thank you for bringing this up and keep up the excellent work you do with your blog.
    x

  8. Limited and cruelly ignorant? Bloody hell talk about political correctness gone mad!

    Female music = music made by females. These women are role models for younger girls who will be looking at them and thinking ‘hang on – I can do that’ and will pick up a guitar, microphone, Ableton software package or whatever and give it a shot. It’s inspirational and we’re hardly talking about the Spice Girls are we?

    And re the black music comment – at what point did Amelia claim that people would refuse to buy music due to the colour of skin? Are you really so tangled up in self-righteousness as to think that is what she was insinuating? You put words into her mouth by claiming she said these emerging artists were more influenced by Radiohead than ‘mainstream black music’ when what she actually said was ‘current US R&B and hip-hop’.

    Try reading an article for what it is and get off your soap box.

  9. Actually reading back over the article again I just noticed that Amelia didn’t use the term ‘female music’. More words being put into her mouth…

  10. BLA says:

    Kerry Jean Power … your reply is fullof what you accuse me of. I’m in no way political correct, trust me, I’ve read the article better than you read my reply and I’m not putting words in once mouth I’m just elaborating on what her words imply. That’s all. But anyway. This is an angry comment trying to attack me on semantics rather than content.

    If I misread something do explain with a few more words than those above.

    To put it simple. Why can’t someone black, female, Belgian, middle-aged or whatever category you want to put yourself in look up to someone like Thom Yorke and say “I can do that too”. In 2010, in our scene, in our part of the world, I see no reason why. That’s what I’m saying.

    What I’m implying is that those labels you put on yourself, black & female in this case, are marketing strategies to hide the essential. And that is make bloody good music and nothing else.

    Please reply on the topic and not the form. Although it’s about form, I know.

    I’m glad M808 understands what I’m saying. Proves I’m not that political correct guy gone mad putting words in once mouth.

    And Lefto, what an utter lame remark is that. You missed a big opportunity to say nothing.

  11. Kas says:

    @BLA,

    I understand your indignation at the state of the industry, but it seems that you’ve picked the wrong target for your ire; you seem to be debating with the author from the same side of the fence.

    “…if one needs to promote his music as being made by a female or black it usually is a sign the actual quality of it is of no means to sell it”.

    Well, I think that’s precisely what the author was saying. I quote:

    “…the cynic in me says that major labels are falling down a big black hole, clutching at branches they hope will all turn in to N Dubz, discarding the rest fast. It’s turning mainstream UK urban music in to Primark and at some point labels will have to start relying on talent, not marketing and promotion.”

    I think that her comparison of mainstream UK “urban” music (“urban” being a euphemism for, if not a more palatable word than “black”) to Primark sees her firmly in agreement with you on that point.

    And I think that, broadly, you make the same point as her in relation to Radiohead. Radiohead has inspired many of the bands she has listed; she sees that as a good thing, diversifying the music these artists make away from the stale mainstream from where they may have otherwise derived their influences. I quote:

    “happily they probably owe more to their parents’ record collections and Radiohead than they do to current US R&B and hip hop.”

    Finally, you write:

    “Are people still refusing to buy music because of the color of the skin of who made it ? That’s just unbelievably sad.”

    You’re telling me, BLA; you’re right, this shouldn’t still be happening in 2010….but that’s just what people do when they disapprove of you on such base grounds; they refuse to put money in your pocket, because one of the key ways they can hurt you is economic. Sadly I don’t make the rules; and neither, crucially, does this article’s author.

  12. cubikmusik says:

    ok, i tweeted then realized i should be commenting.

    first off, my tweets to Amelia (joined up for consistency):
    “good piece over @on_point .(i) think the comments are more about use of titles more than race/gender tbh. and some misunderstanding. but no matter what its distracting from the actual things/ people u were talking about.for what its worth i reckon all you said make sense, are valid and indeed appropriate. context is everything and perhaps its lost”

    so, BLA.
    re: “To put it simple. Why can’t someone black, female, Belgian, middle-aged or whatever category you want to put yourself in look up to someone like Thom Yorke and say “I can do that too”. In 2010, in our scene, in our part of the world, I see no reason why. That’s what I’m saying.”
    Amelia, from what I can see isn’t saying that they can’t look up to Thom Yorke.
    Amelia’s words:
    “and happily they probably owe more to their parents’ record collections and Radiohead than they do to current US R&B and hip hop.”
    I believe that by being happy about it means she supports and indeed looks forward to it.
    I can see her point as it is unfortunate that many musicians outside the US (and indeed inside the US) feel they must take the mainstream sound route to be successful or even to be recognized for their work. The production of good music shouldn’t be constrained by this belief and I do feel that this has been the case in the past.
    So finding your ‘voice’ or ‘sound’ outside of the mainstream is a good thing. If you find a good sound from inside the mainstream that’s a good thing also. As yourself and M808 said (and I’m sure everyone reading or commenting will agree): good music is good music.

    Going back to use of categories:
    As an Irishman I would be more than happy to big up an ‘Irish Electronic Artist’ and would definitely talk up the Irishness. Its nothing got to do with the music at all but got to do with pride in what I identify myself with.
    I agree with Amelia re: females in the industry. It is a sausage fest (not so much in the background though, just facing the public from what I can see). What’s wrong with saying women will take more control of their sound?

    Here goes, gonna hit submit in 5,4,3,2,

  13. BLA – .Amelia was celebrating female musicians and DJ’s, she was celebrating emerging musical talent that takes its influences from sources other than the mainstream.

    I’m not going to get into an internet argument with you about this as I am sure you and I (and Amelia) would agree on more things related to this subject than we disagreed on. As Kas stated above I am sure we are all on the same side of the fence.

    I appreciate that two people can read an article and take completely different things from it – and that this debate is more about confusion regarding ‘labels’ than the actual article itself – but I was at a loss as to how someone could read such a positive and optimistic piece and respond with such negativity.

  14. big johnson says:

    If you suck you suck, male or female. My ears dont need it!
    I appreciate people will fly the flag for their racial/ gender specific groups and thats fine but affimative action has no place in music! Also if you happen to be from a certain group and find it some how impossible to look at another human being from a different race/gender/ sexuality and find inspiration or a role model we should probably build a giant boat…count to 3 and all go back where we came from because we are all wasting our time.
    I consistantly draw inspirtion from other races/sexes and have too many musical role models from different backgrounds to name. Good luck to everyone

  15. BLA says:

    I might be a cat from Brussels / Belgium, active in the forward thinking soulful music scene, with a big love for all things Boogie, Disco, House and more but I do try to avoid to use those terms as labels to market myself.

    I know it would make it easier to get an unique selling point but after a while they would limit me.

    I could complain it’s more difficult to get somewhere if you live in Brussels instead of London, but I don’t.

    My rolemodels are neither Soulwax, Aeroplane, Spritcatcher, Lefto or any other compatriots that are in a small way similar to myself. My big examples are, among others, Theo Parrish, Mr. Scruff and Dilla for instance. Apart from the second none is at first sight much alike to myself, a fat white bloke from Brussels, but I don’t care. They inspire me to reach new heights in their way. And they inspire me with what they do, not really by who they are.

    The thing is that labelling yourself is easy and maybe even positive on short terms but in it the end you are limiting yourself. I do know some things are no headstart to make it in the music scene. Being black, being female but also not being from LDN nor NYC, being in love with a genre that’s utterly unhip, having an outspoken opinion, … . Certainly not in these (lazy) marketing-infested times.

    Labelling yourself is just surrendering to that. Even though it doesn’t seem like that at first. Transcend it, have a lot of patience in doing so, be stubborn and you’ll get somewhere far more rewarding than being remembered for being a black and/or female musician and nothing more.

    This is probably my last comment on this post otherwise I feel like I’m just repeating myself.

  16. radna says:

    the essence of music should be just that I think, music. but music is also part of a culture. it blends in with fashion, with parties, with your social life, with politics sometimes. you can’t deny gender and race also play a certain role there.

    I’d prefer a situation where we don’t deny our gender and race, and respect our history, culture etc. but at the same time have a very open approach to each other. an approach of being curious, instead of putting someone in a certain frame.

    so yes, I enjoy reading the vogue with a girlfriend while listening to hudson mohawke, I also enjoy a talk about what tupac meant for afro-americans – when music is part of life, culture and background are also an influence on the way you appreciate music.

  17. Benny Blanco says:

    If you mention race and gender in your post, then it is obviously a talking point. I agree that an artist is an artist regardless. Quality will always rise and shine. Yes, I want to see more female DJ’s, I do find it more appealing to the eye, much more in fact. My ears don’t really give a damn about gender. The art of good Djing is not only mixing well but reading a crowd and selecting the right music. If she can’t do any of those, then she can fuck off. I suppose that Amelia is right in that the booth is always full of boys. That’s where the Nag Champa comes in.

    The difference now is anyone can be a DJ or a producer. It just means more shit to sift through to get to the good stuff.

    The Africa section is interesting. Certain artists you mentioned have been around for a while. Some have peaked. Although Africa may be the Continent of origin and musical influence, would they want to be known as an Africa artist. I suppose that is up to the artist and the medium. Thom Yorke loves Africa and African music and reffered to Fela many of times. In fact he also bigs up Madlib as a producer.

    Overall, genres are pointless, they help the needy, they guide us. Good music is what it is.

  18. Mr Beatnick says:

    Found this debate quite interesting – as a reader (and on some level, friends with both BLA and PutMeOnit) it’s quite hard to get some distance. i would say that both of you are after the same goals which makes BLA’s outburst a little confusing – i mean PutMeOnIt is guest author right? I think she brought a list that is in line with the “agenda” of her blog (if you want to call it that) which is partly to shine a light on talented women – if you have a cursory glance at most of the blogs of this “scene” you’ll see it’s very male dominated to say the least. So i can’t find fault with that, particularly as the artists she lists are some of my favourite music makers. Dope beats are not specific to gender, nor does “female music” exist as a binary opposition to “male music”, even if IG culture does think we all make MAN BEAT.

    The bit about women in the industry was only one of 4 sections – and you’re also finding fault with the Africa bit. I don’t get that. I mean surely Africa is the most relevant continent to any music discussion in the history of planet earth? Can we not agree to some extent that soulful music must originate there to some extent, even the patterns that Radiohead used on Idioteque? I don’t think the point was about skin colour per se, the point was there’s a massive continent of untapped artistic wealth over the waters which due to all sorts of things (like technological limitations, limited cultural vision etc) we are not engaging with. The best demo i got all last year was from a young man in Namibia in fact, so if that doesn’t cosign Africa as a primary source for new talent in 2010 I don’t know what does.

    The bottom line – if we invite someone to share an opinion, should we not respect and encourage their right to that opinion – not challenge it on terms of gender and race?

  19. RD says:

    women are the new black!

  20. get article Amelia & great comments everyone.

    on the female producer issue…
    My media friends have been discussing this for years. Where are the female producers/DJs? Whenever I see a Georgia Anne Muldrow, it restores my faith in the creative process. Why? In the 90s, my college years, i was often the only Black person & female of any color in my advanced sound engineering classes. Who was my teacher & mentor? Legendary sound engineer Malcolm Chisolm (who was white) who worked for Chess Records and worked with Jazz greats such as Ahmad Jamal (check the liner notes on ‘But Not For Me’). Folks thought I was nuts to want to be ‘behind’ the camera or boards as traditionally, young women are steered toward writing, playing instruments & singing…not producing.

    What makes the ‘good’ music spectrum brighter is the participation of all colors & both genders producing & presenting as a DJ, good music. There’s power in that which benefits us…the recipients.

  21. LeFtOoO says:

    euhm… I still think you need a girlfriend… Bla :-)

    L

  22. BLA says:

    or a boyfriend … why label it ? … or hermaphrodite as the ultimate vagueness … or a bit of everything

  23. JoBee says:

    lovely discussion.female forces are gonna rule lol!!
    prepare you all for supafly revolution !!!
    nice one Alex:)

  24. PMOI says:

    OK let’s clear this up now.

    1. This argument is completely detracting from the great artists who inspired it.

    2. I mentioned FIVE!!! movements (thanks for noticing Beatnick)- (1) that there are more GREAT female DJs & producers around than ever before (2) that there are more GREAT experimental artists of specifically African origin putting music out this year (In a few years we might be hearing loads of interesting music from people of Turkish or Polish descent from the UK and I will find that interesting too). (3) Major labels are signing lots of rappers (4) Lots of people will try working freelance as creatives this year and (5) Lots of people will make amazing live shows.

    I gave all of those groups equal weight. I didn’t initially set out to label anyone or write an article about race and gender, that was picked out of it and amplified by other people so I responded to those issues. I also never talked about or applauded “female music” or “black music” as concepts because I’m not an idiot. Please read Outliers by Malcom Gladwell – it’s great & makes you think about specific patterns and movements in time which is what I was doing.

    3. Your attitude as a listener is but one part of what makes up an artists experience of trying to make their way in the music industry. Try stepping outside of yourself for a minute. All of the artists I brought up in my first two points are BRILLIANT – but in the past brilliant didn’t always = success, sometimes factors (such as gender and race amongst other things) got in the way unfairly. I am saying I’m glad that those things are changing and that more talented people seem to both have the opportunities and confidence to just be themselves – that race and gender matter LESS than they used to. I would never support mediocrity from anyone based on race or gender so I don’t even know where that argument came from.

    Let’s get real about it for a minute – Alex who runs this site was criticized last year for not asking any women for their predictions and very few were mentioned in anyone’s predictions. This year he asked me to write some when we’d never spoken before, maybe that was a coincidence, maybe it was on his mind, I don’t know (or care). The result is my range of interests & experiences are a bit different to the others you might see in this years lists and that’s great – it means a wider range of artists will be recognized & I hope listened to.

    Can you think of a better example of why it’s ok to celebrate the positive things our differences & experiences can bring each other whilst doing our best not to let our differences become prejudices or affect our right to equality? Saying prejudice or inequality doesn’t exist because you don’t experience or believe in them is equally as ridiculous as anyone expecting special treatment because of their gender or race.

    Lastly – BLA I agree with you, that the points you make would imply whoever wrote them was very “1990″ as you put it on Twitter. I didn’t actually make the comments you claim I did however, and when I suggested you misunderstood you said I mustn’t have “written it clearly”. Some people read your initial comment and responded as though I had written what you said I did, so I re-posted the article on my blog with an explanation and so that it could be read without the incorrect context you added. The fact that you have misunderstood me, we are actually on the same side, and you have put words in my mouth has been brought up by several people on here – most of them native English speakers who also understood my initial article and found what I wrote “optimistic” and “uplifting”. If you want to carry on arguing with me about it my email address is info@putmeonit.com – I imagine everyone else has other things to do now.

  25. Dice says:

    great read…both the article and the comments. Reading through them I can but acknowledge what has been said. We all know labels are limiting, but at the same time we need them as a reference. How else would we be able to seek for new music, new talent if not by going through google/youtube/myspace/whatever and typing in those exact labels/phrases/keywords to discover new stuff?

    time for some gza – labels :D

    peace

  26. My list would be more European music
    and it seems like white girls are really
    going to make it in 2010!!! Loool (lame joke)

    I think it’s all good but I guess as a
    music lover looking for elevation
    and higher spirituality in music
    I can understand that mentioning
    things like a country, a race, male/female is not important anymore and should not even be mentionned as it’s not uplifting the subject to a higher form of art but brings it down to one or another human condition… even though it always has it’s origins or inspiration from social, cultural, political background,  the result is a work that goes beyound… I love discussing and talking about that… I have to admit that I’m not too fond of mentionning anything else neither except if it’s an undeniable link with a specific work.
    Let art be art, something elevated… 

    While ment as something positive and also BEING something positive with no bad intentions at all it might be something that limits and offends a music lover on a different mindset.

    “female architects from New Zealand” is what we’ll see more and more btw if you ask me what architecture will bring in 2010… 

  27. T-Jerl says:

    The world be an amazing place if people were recognised for their worth, that colour/race/religion/gender/size/postcode/accent/sexuality weren’t an issue..We’d be muppets to think we can operate blissfully ignorant of them…We all try to make our way having to navigate them in one way or another. Denying that institutionalised prejudice exists is an insult to those that fought so hard for equal rights and have achieved what freedoms do exist today…and for those that continue to challenge the status quo. The artists Amelia has highlighted are (at long last!) rising in a cut-throat industry in which sadly some people have to work and fight twice as hard as others to a) be recognised and supported b) not compromise their integrity. I’ll get my pompoms out for that any day of the week.

  28. Jean Gray says:

    I like a good debate but I get really annoyed by the opinions of people who have no experience or understanding of what they are talking about. Saying things like ‘music is music, and there’s only good music’ over and over and over again, doesn’t mean anything. WTF does that mean?

    Especially if you claim to be a music lover. You’d never say ‘music is music’ when speaking about a beat or a song that you’re crazy about. If you really love it, you’ll break it down to some pathetically obsessive degree because you love it. And that’s what being a music lover is, you’ll know and want to know everything about it, and you’ll be okay with it cos you LOVE it. As a consumer, promoter, engineer or creator of music you should know that music isn’t just music (it’s be a really lame to think that music can simply be defined by it’s 13 notes and endless rhythmic possibilities). Mature for a second and use some discernment, it’s a gift that comes with growing up and opening your eyes and ears to the world around you.

    You don’t know what I would give for a world and an industry where people hear my voice before they see it in the colour of my skin.

    I don’t make soul/rnb music ( i got over it eventually) but I am black and female and I want to contribute to that heritage AND look forward. Are BLA and Billy Palmer going to deny me?
    I always find that people who fight with the black thing or the female thing do so because they are uneasy with it. Cos I love being female, don’t take it away from me.

    Black isn’t a label, it’s the colour of my skin and female? well that’s on my passport, should we be angry about being defined as female by the state in 2010? Is that cruelly ignorant?

    I don’t understand how anyone can be enlightened without awareness.
    Awareness is the thing that brings change. Not trying to re-educate the readers of this article with platitudes that can be more easily attributed to fear and discomfort than a lack of ignorance.

    Like you said, it’s 2010, Wake up please, you’re like 200 years late!

  29. SuperMAN says:

    I like a good debate but I get really annoyed by the opinions of people who have no experience or understanding of what they are talking about. Saying things like ‘music is music, and there’s only good music’ over and over and over again, doesn’t mean anything. WTF does that mean?

    Especially if you claim to be a music lover. You’d never say ‘music is music’ when speaking about a beat or a song that you’re crazy about. If you really love it, you’ll break it down to some pathetically obsessive degree because you love it. And that’s what being a music lover is, you’ll know and want to know everything about it, and you’ll be okay with it cos you LOVE it. As a consumer, promoter, engineer or creator of music you should know that music isn’t just music (it’s be a really lame to think that music can simply be defined by it’s 13 notes and endless rhythmic possibilities). Mature for a second and use some discernment, it’s a gift that comes with growing up and opening your eyes and ears to the world around you.

  30. SuperMAN says:

    PART 2

    You don’t know what I would give for a world and an industry where people hear my voice before they see it in the colour of my skin.
    I don’t make soul/rnb music ( I got over it eventually) but I am black and female and I want to contribute to that heritage AND look forward. Are BLA and Billy Palmer going to deny me?
    I always find that people who fight with the black thing or the female thing do so because they are uneasy with it. Cos I love being female, don’t take it away from me.
    Black isn’t a label, it’s the colour of my skin and female? well that’s on my passport, should we be angry about being defined as female by the state in 2010? Is that cruelly ignorant?

    I don’t understand how anyone can be enlightened without awareness.
    Awareness is the thing that brings change. Not trying to re-educate the readers of this article with platitudes that can be more easily attributed to fear and discomfort than a lack of ignorance.
    Like you said, it’s 2010, Wake up please, you’re like 200 years late!

  31. marv says:

    “I mean how hard can it be to learn a bit of CSS, Photoshop, or Logic?”

    it takes a lot more than knowing a bit of logic or photoshop to “become” a creative. there’s a new wave of people calling themselves journalists, graphic designers and musicians, but it doesn’t mean they come anywhere close to being qualified. we all know that. people study for years on prolific design, music, writing courses to become very good at what they do. others are just well on top of their game but it takes practice and time. just because the newave have a few hundred followers and close friends telling them they’re good doesn’t mean they actually are, or that they’re making any money. you mention seth godin, but not everyone who starts a blog has as much interesting information to follow. photoshopping a mediocre flyer doesn’t make you a graphic designer worth employing.

    good female DJ’s and producers have been around for years, they just had less exposure through blogs and networking sites. Blanco is right, just because she’s female doesn’t make her good. just because she’s good doesn’t make her consistent. it’s about good music, djing, producing whether from a she/he black/white.

  32. @Jean Grey > not sure if I completely understood your post but I guess it’s cool if you got female on your passport… not sure what I’d be denying anyway. Mine says male and I guess that’s ok too ? anyway, this is becoming a stupid discussion…

    @putmeonit Thanks for the upcoming list, I found it very interesting names and I’m glad you shared these in your post. (haven’t checked them all yet, but I will!).

    If anyone wants to fight at the same time a battle concerning origin, male/female because they find that necessary in general or personally that’s fine with me as long is it makes sense. (has something to do with the initial post and subject)

    I love y’all anyway so no need to battle with me. I surrender to women immediately anyway haha

  33. G says:

    Marv, being able to work with applications like photoshop, logic etc may indeed not make you a qualified designer/producer/orwhatever. But it is true that more & more the materials (both soft- & hardware) to create stuff at a (semi-)professional level are available to the masses. And again, while just having the means doesn’t make you qualified, there certainly are some real creative people around who are able to put something totally new on the table, regardless of whether they’ve had the education or not. (Not having had the education may in some cases even play in their advantage I think!) Nowadays these people do have the possibility to create, print, publish, etc in a way that wasn’t imaginable just a few years ago.

    On the other hand, I agree this might not really be new for 2010, but then again, it all keeps evolving and maybe the global crisis will result in more people going freelance as well.

    So in short I think it’s more about creative minds being more & more enabled to do what they do best. Create.

    Not going to get in on the other discussion haha!

  34. This has been great – a snapshot of the depth of creative juice and colliding ideas that has makes the UK music scene the most interesting in the world.

    Creativity is all about memory I reckon – our personal and collective cultural memory gives us our creative juices. The political ‘memory’ of the industry gives us the conditions we need to fly – or not. Of course its right to acknowledge the fact that the industry treats female producers and DJ’s differently. Its a simple fact. And M808 is right – you gotta be ready and conscious of it to take it on. And Amelia has merely highlighted those artists who are.

    That’s how shit changes – you got to acknowledge what is then do something to make it what it should be. That’s how Motown changed pop music, or the Advancement of Creative Musicians in the 60′s shifted what we now know to be jazz. It’s how Put Me on It is shifting things now for those artists who are otherwise underrepresented. We should be celebrating the new frontiers of creative possibility such artists and taste-makers open up….

    Thom Yorke is a big inspiration to me – but I’m not gonna lie. If there was a sister operating on that level with that amount of creative freedom, I would print a life-size banner of her face and hang it down the front of my house I’d be that proud.

    And there are all the other new frontiers opening up which Amelia flags – the new Africans representing a whole new sound, new technology liberating conversations like these…Its an exciting time…

    I reckon we should meet same place, same time next year to see how the predictions work out.

    Thanks everyone for some creative mind stimulation. Love it x

  35. Pingback: www.on-point.be - vic&lloyd say: go!

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